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This is day two of my latest business marketing plan. The overall goal is to eventually have a number of products that I can market off all my online properties and for live seminars. The initial goal is to find out what the most requested thing I do, based on a variety of options, is what the masses want.

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I have to admit that in a way I’m proud of myself. After all, though it’s a lie saying it’s easy doing what I’ve been doing, the one thing it afforded me was marketing to one particular niche… even if the folks in that niche really didn’t want to talk to me.

That’s a bit of honesty I finally had to overcome in order to truly branch out into other things. While it’s true that most of the posts on this blog have been related to leadership over the years, I haven’t really marketed anything but health care and possibly writing in the longest time; certainly not on this blog.

Just to mention this, I’ve created other products in the past. There are a few on the main page of this blog, which you can see a few of over there on the left. A few other things I’ve created include:

Mitchell Employee Evaluation Module – a system that will help you hire the type of person you’re looking for based on real criteria instead of just how educated someone might be

Mitchell Manager Training Program – a 5-part course for training new managers that I created almost 10 years ago

Social Media, SEO & Your Business – a webinar on how to communicate with others on social media and optimizing one’s website for business purposes

I’m not a novice at creating things. I’ll admit that my live presentations have a lot more content and go into a lot more detail. However, since I just discovered Udemy, which allows for longer and more complicated training programs, I’ve been thinking about trying that for a few things.

In any case, I’m trying to branch out instead of being a one-trick pony. This is part of the “life you choose to live” side of life that I’m shooting for. I’m not giving up health care finance, and I’m certainly not giving up on leadership. I’m just branching out more, working on the entrepreneur side of things while trying to increase my sphere of influence; heck, one of these days I’m going to make a top 50 list that’s going to make me rich and famous (a reference to Kermit the Frog’s appeal to Orson Welles in the very first Muppet movie; I had hoped to add that clip here but it doesn’t seem to be on YouTube; oh well…)!

Now, the topics…

Below are 9 categories of things I’m very proficient in; yes, someone can actually be good at more than one thing. Under a couple of them, I’ve broken the category down slightly further than the main category.

The first thing I need is for you to pick one thing; one choice per person. You can leave your request on the blog, or you can send me an email to mitch@imjustsharing.

The second thing I need is for you to pick how you’d like the training delivered to you. One of these I’ve put in there in case local folks participate in amazing numbers; gotta have hope right? Or, if you believe you’d able to pull something together that could get me to come to where you are and get paid for it… even better.

The reward? Other than what I promise will be a top flight lesson, the first idea that has five people select it and the way it’s delivered, I’ll pick 1 person from that group to receive that training for free. If I get 20 people eventually under that same selection, I’ll give away 2 more free trainings.

At some point, if I don’t reach an agreed upon number, I’ll probably take the top 3 and run this again. As I said, I’m putting this out on 4 blogs, and since each blog addresses something different, you might think that picking something on this blog would be a snap… but you just never know… not everything below is something that’s covered on this blog. Who knows, some of you might learn something new about me from the choices below :-)

These are the areas you have to select from (categories are underlined):

Hospital Revenue Cycle

Medical Billing techniques
Understanding Charge Master
Understanding the Revenue Cycle

Customer Service

How to provide good customer service
Training others to be good at customer service

Motivation

How to motivate yourself
Motivating Others

Leadership

Being A Better Leader
Training Others To Be Leaders

Diversity

Self Employment

Personal Budgeting

Blogging

Business blogging
blogging for money
blog writing
article writing for others

Social Media

benefits and dangers of social media
social media marketing tips
YouTube & video basics

Now, method of delivery:

Live seminar
Book
Udemy course
Webinars
Email course
Podcasts
1 on 1 training (in person, Skype, Google Hangout, phone)

Remember, only one per person. If you mention more than one, you have to tell me which one is first. You don’t even have to promise me you’ll buy; I just want to know which one you find the most important to you, and how you’d prefer it to be delivered.

I thank everyone in advance for participating and sharing this post, or any other post from this week, or any of my other posts from any of my other blogs regarding this. I really appreciate all your help. And, just so you know, business as usual again come Friday.
 

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In the post I wrote last Friday titled I’m Not As Smart As I Think I am, I talked a little bit about my broken business model. In general, it’s my opinion that instead of being a true business person the way I know I should be, I’ve been a hired gun, mainly through the efforts of other people, although they wouldn’t have known me without my reaching out to them.

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looking professorial!

On one of my other blogs I said this: “We should learn how to live the life we want instead of the life we think we should be living. And if we can make money that way… then why not?

Why not indeed? As my friend Holly said in the only comment that post on Friday got, “None of us are as smart as we’d LIKE to think we are (or as stupid as our Inner Critic would have us believe in our darker moments).”

I’d had this idea floating in the back of my mind for a while. I always figured I was going to get there sooner or later. But after talking with this guy in a general conversation last Wednesday I decided that yes, I was going to go through with it, and I was going to try to bring some folks along with me on the adventure.

What I’m going to do is work on a series of courses, training if you will, on a variety of subjects I happen to be quite proficient in. However, before I begin, I’m putting out a general survey asking which of the many subjects I know well would folks like me to create, and then how would they like them presented. The overwhelming majority of ways to present are available for everyone; one of the choices probably wouldn’t be, but you’ll know that when you look at it.

I’m going to have a blog post about this every day through Thursday; my Friday post will be back to something more normal for this blog. If you’re wondering why I’m doing this, check the link above, as I explained it a bit there. If you’re wondering where I got the idea from for what I’m doing this week, check out my review of Ryan Levesque’s book Ask on one of my other blogs.

By the way, I’m not only doing this from this blog. I’m doing it from this one and 3 others. After all, some folks who might read this blog regularly might not know of my other blogs, thus might not know why I’m proficient in other areas. Here’s a brief synopsis on those blogs:

Mitch’s Blog – this is my more prolific blog, which I created after this one. I mainly talk about blogging and social media and things associated with it, which includes motivation, something I also talk about on this blog.

Top Finance Blog – this is my finance site where I mainly talk about ways to save money and budgeting. Occasionally I talk about other financial issues, and there are a lot of other topics that have been addressed on this site because, for a couple of years, I accepted guest post on this site (but no more).

Medical Billing Answers Blog – this is obviously the blog to my medical billing site. The posts on this site mainly concern medical billing and health care revenue cycle issues, health topics and recommendations for patients who have to deal with medical bills.

Of course you already know what I mainly write about on this blog; at least I hope you do. If not, take a look around; I think it’s pretty cool, especially as this blog is now 10 1/2 years old.

Enough with the preamble; let’s get to the meat of things.

Let’s get to it. Below are 9 categories of things I’m very proficient in; yes, someone can actually be good at more than one thing. Under a couple of them, I’ve broken the category down slightly further than the main category.

The first thing I need is for you to pick one thing; one choice per person. You can leave your request on the blog, or you can send me an email to mitch@imjustsharing.

The second thing I need is for you to pick how you’d like the training delivered to you. One of these I’ve put in there in case local folks participate in amazing numbers; gotta have hope right? Or, if you believe you’d able to pull something together that could get me to come to where you are and get paid for it… even better.

The reward? Other than what I promise will be a top flight lesson, the first idea that has five people select it and the way it’s delivered, I’ll pick 1 person from that group to receive that training for free. If I get 20 people eventually under that same selection, I’ll give away 2 more free trainings.

At some point, if I don’t reach an agreed upon number, I’ll probably take the top 3 and run this again. As I said, I’m putting this out on 4 blogs, and since each blog addresses something different, you might think that picking something on this blog would be a snap… but you just never know… not everything below is something that’s covered on this blog. Who knows, some of you might learn something new about me from the choices below :-)

These are the areas you have to select from (categories are underlined):

Leadership

Being A Better Leader
Training Others To Be Leaders

Diversity

Customer Service

How to provide good customer service
Training others to be good at customer service

Hospital Revenue Cycle

Medical Billing techniques
Understanding Charge Master
Understanding the Revenue Cycle

Motivation

How to motivate yourself
Motivating Others

Blogging

Business blogging
blogging for money
blog writing
article writing for others

Social Media

benefits and dangers of social media
social media marketing tips
YouTube & video basics

Self Employment

Personal Budgeting

Now, method of delivery:

Book
Udemy course
Webinars
Email course
Podcasts
Live seminar
1 on 1 training (in person, Skype, Google Hangout, phone)

Remember, only one per person. If you mention more than one, you have to tell me which one is first. You don’t even have to promise me you’ll buy; I just want to know which one you find the most important to you, and how you’d prefer it to be delivered.

I thank everyone in advance for participating and sharing this post, or any other post from this week, or any of my other posts from any of my other blogs regarding this. I really appreciate all your help. And, just so you know, business as usual again come Friday.
 

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I’ll start with this; I’m a fairly intelligent guy. I think there are a lot of smart people who try to downplay it but I’m not one of those people. I’m certainly not at the level of renaissance man as Neil deGrasse Tyson, but I try to be. I read books on a lot of different topics and have done a lot of different things that are based on having the right knowledge. I know a lot of things about a lot of stuff, and there are some things I believe I’m pretty great at.

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That’s why it’s always very depressing when I realize that I’m not as smart as I think I am; not even close. Let me explain.

You know the phrase that many people use as the definition of insanity: “The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results.” Actually, I don’t think that’s insanity at all; it’s being stupid. Sometimes, that fits me to a T.

What’s the problem? The problem is that I’ve been in business on my own for 14 years, but I’m not overly successful. A big part of it is because of my leaning towards consulting in health care finance.

I work hard at convincing the people who are the ones who can hire me that I know how to solve a large part of their problems as it concerns revenue and cash. I do that because when I get the opportunity to do so I’ve had some major successes. I even talk about what I consider my biggest success, helping a large hospital to increase their revenue by $730 million in a year’s time, a more than 100% increase in their yearly revenue, which resulted in a very large increase in cash at the time.

You know what I get? Almost nothing; nada; zip. In essence, I’m trying to convince people who don’t understand what I’m telling them and pretty much don’t care to not necessarily accept me, but just to talk to me; is that so hard?

Actually, yes it is. When I get a health care gig I get paid well enough and quick enough that I can accumulate funds nicely. Yet, there are long gaps, which means instead of being able to grow that cash in a more regular way I end up spending all my reserves, barely making it to the next adventure.

Frankly, that’s a lousy business model. It’s also a very passive business model. It’s a frustrating business model. Finally, it’s an unrealistic business model for long term success.

The thing is, for all the business pundits who say one should find an industry and basically concentrate on that, it’s not always true. There’s around 5,500 hospitals in the United States, and even that number is kind of false. There are systems with multiple hospitals; in some records each hospital is considered individually, but the reality is that it’s one hospital. When I worked for a hospital system based in Rochester years ago there were 4 hospitals in the system but it acted as one because only one made all the decisions for the rest. That shrinks the number of potential clients one can go after.

Back in March I wrote a post here titled Changing One’s Business Model where I gave 7 things I wanted to look at regarding my overall business. I went back to look at that post and zeroed in on one main point, something that was highlighted by a conversation I had with someone a couple of nights ago. That point: “I want actual clients.”

That’s the entire thing right there. I want to find people who’ll work with me and come back to me over and over. The model I have right now will never do that; once I’ve done my business, I’m sent off and never hear from those folks again, whether I do good or not.

So… come Monday I’m changing the focus a little bit… maybe a lot, depending on how it all goes. But I’m not talking about it until Monday… this is just a teaser, a heads up that something is coming. And it’s going to involve anyone who reads this blog, my I’m Just Sharing blog or my Top Finance Blog site. It offers the potential of either changing things drastically or going absolutely nowhere.

Either way, as I wrote last week, we all have to do something when there’s nothing to lose. I’m not giving up health care finance, and since the majority of articles on this blog are related to leadership, I’m not giving that up either. Something else is changing though; if you care, or even if you really don’t, come Monday folks will start knowing, and if anyone cares, they’ll get to help make some decisions on how things will go from this point on.

If it works, I just might be as smart as I’d like to think I am. Maybe that is… :-)
 

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Almost two years ago I wrote a post talking about how so many people are trying to attain perfection and feeling bad because they can’t get there. I said that while it’s great shooting for it, that believing it can ever be reached and then maintained is an unrealistic goal.

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David Clow via Compfight

I figured it was time to bring it into the health care arena, an area I know pretty well. After all, when things aren’t perfect in health care, people can get hurt and some people die; that’s a nice thing to think about isn’t it?

A couple of decades ago I was working in this hospital where, on the wall of one of the big conference rooms, there was a plaque that had been put up. It said:

“A 1% error rate means 10,000 babies could die out of every 1 million. We need to be better than that.”

That sounds pretty bad doesn’t it? In one way we’re lucky that the percentage is lower than that; in another way… well, let’s look at some numbers, just for perspective.

In the United States, we average close to 4 million births a year. We also average around 11,300 deaths of newborns a year. That comes in around .28%. As bad as it is thinking about babies dying, that’s a better percentage than 1%.

Until you look at this stat; out of the top 68 industrialized countries in the world, not only does the United States have the highest rate of deaths at 35%, but it’s 50% higher than the other 67 countries combined. Makes you think differently doesn’t it?

There’s a lot of pressure put on hospitals in the United States. There’s also this constant battle between error rates and money; might as well put it out there for all to see because people in health care know it already.

There are a lot of reimbursement rules that can penalize hospitals for poor performance. To try to fix many of these things, it takes more money than most hospitals can generate. The general public and the government believe it can all be taken care of easily; not even close.

That’s because, at least as it pertains to babies, a lot of the issues that lead to these deaths aren’t internal, but external. Per a story from NBC News, a group called Save the Children said that politics and culture both play a role.

“Many babies in the United States are born too early. The U.S. preterm birth rate (1 in 8 births) is one of the highest in the industrialized world (second only to Cyprus). In fact, 130 countries from all across the world have lower preterm birth rates than the United States”.

They also added: “Poverty, racism and stress are likely to be important contributing factors to first-day deaths in the United States and other industrialized countries.”

You might not believe it but this article isn’t about health care per se, though I used them as my example, especially the information about babies. It’s an article helping to explain why perfection often can’t be attained and how the fault doesn’t always lie with the party you might expect.

I’ll say this; every hospital in the country has health errors and problems with cash; some more than most. You will never have a perfect hospital that doesn’t make mistakes because there’s never enough personnel or enough money to get there.

Sometimes it’s the hospital’s fault. Sometimes it’s the fault of those who aren’t in health care who get to make the rules. In a way it’s like politicians who want the CIA to stop terrorism yet doesn’t want them to do anything that someone might term “unethical”… or at least not tell anyone what’s going on.

Overall, none of us can avoid looking at outside factors when we’re shooting for perfection, or any semblance close to it. Remember last year when LeBron James, the best basketball player in the NBA, cramped up when the arena in San Antonio lost its air conditioning? Remember this year when he was far and away the best player in the finals, but the strength of his supporting cast went missing because of injuries?

It would be a nice world if perfection was something that could be attained and kept by many of us. It’s also realistic. I’ve heard people talking about going on vacation in “paradise”, only to mention later that they had to deal with bugs, too much heat, high prices and a host of other things. Yet, they had a pretty good time anyway (although the bugs thing would ruin it for me…).

That’s the thing about reaching for perfection. Even if you can’t attain it things can be pretty good… if you have control of most of the factors.

American health care is going to be what it is until there are a lot of changes both internally and externally. For the rest of us… we can make our lives better, but if we think we’re ever going to be perfect and that we have to get there to enjoy our lives… it’s only going to end in disappointment.

At least that’s my take on it; maybe you feel different?
 

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Every once in a while I get to thinking that it’s time to make certain types of changes in my life. Sometimes they’re personal changes; sometimes they’re professional changes. I’m sure I’m not alone in this thought.

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melizards via Compfight

What happens when you get to a point when you feel there’s nothing to lose? Sounds kind of stark doesn’t it?

Yet, it happens every single day somewhere around the world and in the United States. People committing suicide, people killing someone they feel has pushed them to the limit… that kind of indiscriminate thinking helps no one and the consequences of acting on something like that don’t end well for anyone.

Luckily, I never get to that point. Every once in a while I start thinking about having nothing to lose when it comes to my business. Sometimes things aren’t going as smoothly as I’d like it to.

The thing about being an independent consultant is that there are often long gaps between projects. You market, but you’re not always sure you’re marketing properly, or if your message is reaching the right people, if anyone. You start to question how you’re doing things, do you have the proper call to action, or is the problem that no one really cares what you do, especially if they’re not in the market for it at that time.

That’s a marketing issue though, and not a life issue. I’ve been lucky to not have anything like that happen. However, when I was a hospital director, there were times when I’d have an employee come to me with an issue and say they felt like they had nothing to lose.

The problem with most people is that the “nothing to lose” discussion is often accompanied with way too much emotion. Emotions can be very hard to control; I know that one first hand. They’re really hard when you’re not expecting something to happen that does, or when something happens that you knew was coming but still weren’t prepared for.

With many older couples, “nothing to lose” often translates into “nothing to live for”. It’s amazing how many husband and wives pass away within days or weeks of each other, especially when the surviving spouse wasn’t ill.

[55/365] - Suicide Prevention Day
Corrie… via Compfight

That’s known as “failure to thrive”, which manifests itself in many different ways, such as folks who stop eating so that their life will end; sometimes it’s intentional, sometimes it’s not.

Anyway, an employee would present something to me because, believe it or not, I’m a pretty good listener. For me, business may be business, but there’s also a time for compassion; every good leader needs to learn this one.

One of the best techniques for getting at someone’s problem is to ask questions, which also proves you’ve been listening. I’ve found that often, when I ask the question “What are you going to do”, you’ll either get “I don’t know” or you’ll get some kind of answer, sometimes the wrong one, followed by “I’ve got nothing to lose.”

The truth is that “nothing to lose” can be pretty risky, no matter what it concerns. Every once in a while it’s not, but at other times it can lead to catastrophic results, as I showed above. Although I usually hate giving straight up advice, especially on personal matters, whenever I hear that phrase I figure it’s time to show what could be lost if it’s critical enough.

For instance, I like to ask who else might be affected by the action. If children are involved you want to see if the person considered them. Maybe it involves parents or siblings. It could affect livelihood, finances and the like.

Any time “nothing to lose” is used for going in a negative direction, it almost never turns out bad. That’s what I’ve dealt with most of the time.

On the other hand, if “nothing to lose” is going in a positive direction, then I’ve always been one to encourage that kind of thinking, even if it might be drastic. I always believe that positive action is better than negative action, because positive action tends to bring positive things, even if they’re not the things one was expecting.

Thus, any time I can, I’m always looking to help people turn “nothing to lose” into something positive, even if that positive action is to take a step back and think more about their situation. I believe that sometimes it takes baby steps to get to success.

As for taking risks if someone feels there’s nothing to lose… well, check out the video below where I respond to that particular question…
 


https://youtu.be/Wtq8n7irD3g

That’s my thought on the matter; what’s yours?
 

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Anybody can learn anything right? Actually, no. It’s not even close to the truth.

For instance, as much as I’ve tried over the years I just can’t absorb anything much about cars. I like how some of them look and I love the colors. I sometimes like the interiors. But if it involves engines or anything under the hood, my mind’s not taking it in. I don’t even know where the oil goes; yeah, I know, it’s a shame.

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This means I’ll never put in to do any kind of work in the automobile industry. Everything isn’t for everyone.

That being said, one would think there should be some things that you might be able to teach anyone. I tend to believe that I can teach anyone leadership. I like to think that I can help anyone get motivated.

I know that’s not true though. Often, the reason isn’t that someone isn’t smart enough, but that they’re not ready to learn the lesson, or don’t want to learn the lesson. It’s a shame because sometimes you really want to get a lesson across that’s just not going to work because the other person won’t cooperate… sometimes they don’t know they’re not cooperating.

Case in point. Over the weekend I decided to try a kind of experiment, although when I first thought about it I wasn’t thinking experiment.

Some of you might have heard about this guy who, after Serena Williams won Wimbledon, went on Twitter and said that the only reason she won is because she’s so “manly”. J. K. Rowling responded to him, yet the entire thing stayed on the inside pages of the news for about a week.

It stayed on my mind as well, and I decided to try to engage him and talk about the ethics of his actions. To save time, I wrote about the experience on my other blog, which you can check out here if you’re interested.

At the end of about an hour I realized I was beating a dead horse. He didn’t get it. He couldn’t figure out why deciding that not only was a person good because of her physical presence but calling it out in an insulting manner wasn’t a good thing to do. I tried everything, including asking him how he’d react if the tables were turned on him or his family members. Nope, he just wasn’t getting it.

I left the conversation feeling pretty good with what I said and how I said it. I was also slightly frustrated because he never seems to get an indication as to why people didn’t like what he said. He wasn’t ready to learn it I finally figured. He’s relatively young, early 20’s. Sometimes it takes a bit of aging for more ethical behavior to come to someone who, I assume, isn’t necessarily bereft of some niceties.

Learning how to use the simulator
Creative Commons License Oregon Department of Transportation
via Compfight

I could afford to just leave that conversation and get on with life. His not figuring it out won’t affect my life. Truthfully, it wasn’t just for him. Seems he’d accumulated a number of followers since his first statement, people who felt he had the right to say what he said. None of them helped him out during our conversation; maybe someone got the point.

In business though, you can’t afford to do the same thing. We all have to face the reality that what we do isn’t for everyone. I’ve always said that we have to treat everyone fair, not necessarily equal. This means figuring out the speed at which people learn and how much they retain once they’ve learned something. We have to acknowledge that everyone won’t learn at the same pace.

Sometimes people never learn it though. I’ve seen that in health care; it’s really not all that easy a business. There are always nuances; it could take years for someone to fully figure out everything there is to know about the work they do.

Still, there are minimum standards that have to be reached. That’s why, as with almost every other job I know of, there are probationary periods. That’s when you’re supposed to be at your most adept in evaluating the training and learning process of each person.

If they’re missing a few things here and there, you modify the training process to help reinforce what they need to learn. If they’re not getting it at all… you have to do the right thing for the company and let them go.

No one likes firing employees. I haven’t had to do it often but I’ve had to do it. As Mr. Spock once said, “the needs of the many outweigh the needs of the one”. If you don’t let go of an employee whose work is substandard, one who can’t figure out the process, it impacts the morale of everyone else in the department and smacks of favoritism. Then you have another problem to deal with, one that’s harder to overcome.

When people aren’t learning and you’ve done everything you can to teach them something, you can feel good about having to take the next step because it’s necessary. If you didn’t do what you needed to do, that’s when you should call your own processes or motives into thought.

Never be afraid to make the right decision, even if someone can’t learn from your trying to teach them the right way.
 

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Is it a question of privilege?

That’s what I find myself asking sometimes when I see someone who, even if they’re not rich and don’t have the easiest of lives, complaining that someone worse off than them is getting something that, in their minds, they don’t deserve.

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karlhans via Compfight

Last night it was someone I know who was wondering why poor people in New York City deserved to have free access to the internet when he had to pay for it here in central New York.

Days ago it was someone complaining because someone they didn’t know was going to qualify for full subsidies so they could have health care while this person, who worked and, though they had health care through their employer, griped that because he had a job and had to contribute to his own health coverage that it was an unfair handout he was paying for through his taxes.

Is this what we’ve become America, a selfish country that has to pound on someone who has less than what you have, for whatever reason, to make yourself feel better?

I’m not writing from a position of being high and mighty by the way. I’m someone who, on another blog a couple of years ago, asked if we should donate money to charity after all. However, in that context I was talking about all the different charities that come to our door or call us on the phone asking for money when we have no idea who they are or whether or not they’re legitimate.

I also cringe whenever I encounter people who are begging for money, especially people standing by the road with their signs. In a way, it’s both a kind of pressure to help and a wonder if they’re legitimately poor and in need, especially where I live, in the suburbs, where the only way they could have gotten there was either by taking the bus or having someone drop them off.

Still, I’m not one who begrudges anyone for anything that someone is willing to give them to help them live a better life, even if it’s only a little bit better. I don’t begrudge people who make a lot of money that someone else might think they don’t deserve, so it makes little sense to go in the other direction either.

Bangladesh, Ramadan 2011.
IHH Humanitarian Relief Foundation via Compfight

I tend to believe that a true leader finds ways to help when they can. So, even though I don’t always give money to people who are begging for it on the street (sometimes I do, and sometimes I’ve even paid for a meal for someone who’s asking for money for food), and even though I don’t give money to every charity that asks for it, I do my part.

For instance, I’m a board member of an organization called Arise locally, which works with and advocates for the disabled, and I’ve been with them for almost 13 years. When Wegmans, our local grocery chain, has the tickets out where you can donate a little bit more money that goes towards helping to feed people I’ll often pull a ticket and ask them to scan it. I do contribute to charities of people I know and trust, and most of the time if I’m around I’ll buy the Girl Scout cookies (hey, that counts… lol).

In my opinion, true leadership is helping to take care of others when they can’t take care of themselves for one reason or another. If they’re not even trying to help themselves, even after you’ve tried to help them, that’s another matter entirely; sometimes you have to let them go.

Otherwise, that’s my belief. I’ll continue trying to do what I can, when I can, but I’ll never expect that anyone else has to do anything for anyone if they don’t want to. After all, we all have a right to do or not do whatever our mood is, especially when we’ve worked for our money.

I’ll also call people out whenever they’re intentionally putting someone down just because they’re getting help. That type of thing helps no one, and only fosters bad feelings all around.

Of course, that’s my belief; do you agree or disagree?
 

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