Last week was a strange one for me. I lost a client and I lost the opportunity to bid on a client. I got some initial interest in a book I’m working on. I did an experiment where I only drank water for the week. I heard from my mother that my grandmother is actually communicating again, not overly but enough to have cracked her first joke in 3 months. And I saw the Harry Potter movie at a midnight showing and want to see it again.

Every day our minds get pulled into many different directions. If the accumulation of good or bad dominates, that will tend to push you in either direction, and then you can get locked into it so deeply that there’s no getting out of it.

Even working from home, my days aren’t all that much different from anyone else’s. I have days that go well, days that go badly, and days where there’s a mixture of both. I try to stay even keeled no matter which direction things go, but I’m not going to lie and say that my mind never gets hijacked one way or the other.

There’s a reason we see all these tales about the “dark side” of things. It’s been proven that it’s easier to wallow in negativity than it is to uplift yourself. For every 24 good things you hear, that one bad thing you hear can shut you down for the day sometimes. It doesn’t even have to be anything overtly mean; that’s how insidious it can be.

Sometimes people want to know why something that might not be a benefit to them occurred. It adds to allowing ones mind to be hijacked in a negative direction. This past week I read about people who want to find out why someone subscribed from their newsletter or blog, or why someone turned down their Facebook invitation, or even looking to see who has dropped them from Twitter or the new Google+.

I asked all of them the same question; why do you want to know? The standard answer, at least for newsletters, is that people say they can’t improve if they don’t know why people leave. I always say then just concentrate on the people you still have and work on keeping them happy. It’s more positive and uplifting because for the most part those people are going to tell you nice things, even if they have a criticism or two. And let’s be truthful; if someone’s criticism was that they didn’t like your red logo, are you really going to run out and change it?

What types of things hijack your mind and upset you, and what do you do to overcome them, if you can?

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